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Posts Tagged ‘architecture’

Monument to Construction Workers

Monument to Construction Workers

This beautiful park sits on a half acre of land in downtown Toronto’s financial district. What a wonderful oasis for nearby workers and those of us who live downtown! There is an indoor garden as well but it’s only open on weekdays.

Cloud Gardens is a result of a partnership between the City of Toronto, Trizec Properties and Markborough Properties. Baird/Sampson Architects, Milus Bollenbourghe Topps Watchorn Landscape Architects, and artist Margaret Priest won the design competition in 1990. The awesome Monument to Construction Workers, built in 1993, is a tribute to the men and women whose labour has built and rebuilt the city.

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013I live a couple blocks away from this beautiful historic cathedral. The architecture, art and garden feel welcoming and the organist’s music was lovely.

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St. Lawrence Market neighbourhood – got to love the quirky Flatiron building!

Sugar Beach

Sugar Beach – warm & sunny today, great for enjoying this repurposed space

Repuporposed space - from derelict parking lot to Sugar Beach

Repurposed lakeside space – from derelict parking lot to Sugar Beach

Distillery District - old truck

Earlier in the week: Distillery District

Distillery District

Distillery District – historic repurposed buildings and contemporary sculpture

Distillery District on a quiet Monday afternoon

Distillery District on a quiet Monday afternoon

Distillery District sculpture

Distillery District sculpture

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Central Chambers building, Queen Anne Revival style, 1890

June 4th & 5th marked the 10th annual Doors Open Ottawa weekend. Of the 111 participating sites I made it out to about 10. There were a few others I would have liked to visit but late starts, bus schedules, distances, walking and just enjoying the day came into play. Weatherwise it was a perfect weekend.

The Central Chambers building is one of my favourites. It looks more like a contemporary revival rather than a Victorian-era building. It was the first building in Ottawa to have an electric elevator and is thought to be the first in North America with bay windows.

The grounds at Rideau Hall are spectacular. I wonder if the Governor Generals ever have the time or inclination to enjoy this beautiful oasis. As for the residence, the tent room, a former indoor tennis court, is kinda quirky and gay, but, what I most enjoyed were the paintings representing early immigration to Canada.

And just a couple blocks away, Gordon Harrison’s cottage studio was a lovely spot with live music, wine and, of course, quite awesome art works.

The Lester B. Pearson building, home to the Department of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, had a great collection of models of Canadian embassies in other parts of the world, as well as staff, literature and video on DFAIT’s roles.

Maplelawn is a beautiful Georgian-style home and garden. The historical building has been re-adapted and currently functions as a restaurant. The walled gardens date back to 1833 and served as a vegetable garden. It holds a lovely collection of perennials and the grounds are maintained by volunteers.

The Enriched Bread Artists and Gladstone Clayworks Coop are housed in another re-adapted building. The 1924 industrial building was the site of the Standard Bread Factory. I had meant to stop in at the nearby Traffic Operations but with thoughts of coffee in my head it slipped my mind.

I had started Sunday at Fairfields, a 19th century Gothic Revival farmhouse. It was home to five generations of the Bell family and also functioned as a tavern and hotel. In addition to farming, various members of the family were active in law and politics. A number of period artifacts were on display in the garden and, even with the interpreter’s clues, I was not able to guess what most of them had been used for.

Keg Manor – Thompson House, Maplelawn

Maplelawn Gardens

Standard Bread, 1924

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