Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Tule tree’

(December 2008)

I love Oaxaca! Unlike the highter altitude location of Guanajuato, it’s very hot here, sweltering actually. On the way here I was awed by my first ever sighting of a volcano and sensed the shift from North American to Central American Mexico. After a late night arrival I spent the first day walking and sitting and drinking (water) and walking and people-watching and walking some more. The Zocalo is quite large, lit for the season and filled with tourists, locals, and vendors. Oaxaca is reknowned for its food and crafts and neither disappoint.

The city has a population of approximately 200,000 and is a big tourist draw. Vendors, including children, actively try to sell their wares, even while you’re seated at one of the many outdoor patio restaurants. Beggars, mostly women with children, are stationed along the main streets. I’m still touched by the soft-spoken little boy who ran after me and asked for my almost empty bottle of water.

The historic centre and ruins at Monte Albán have been designated a UNESCO World Heritage site.  Monte Albán is situated in the mountains and the setting is spectacular! It’s an ancient Zapotec captital and during its peak, around 500 BC, it had a population of around 25,000.  Eventually, it was overtaken by the Mixtecs. According to our guide, it was destroyed by nature. Apparently, the Zapotecs and Mixtecs were frequently at war. The Aztecs expanded into the Oaxaca region but this was short-lived and ended with the Spanish conquest.

I spent the following day in town and wandered through the cultural museum. I was impressed by the Day of the Dead artwork on display. The artist’s graphic skill and the subject mattter were striking. Mexico has produced many highly talented artists. 

New Year’s Eve, I ventured out on yet another tour. This time it was to the Mitla ruins. Mitla is a small Zapotec site with a unique and intricate stone mosiac fretwork. It is not as old as Monte Alban; however, the town has been continuously inhabited. Apparently, the Spanish had the site destroyed due to its religious and political significance.

The tour also included a visit to the Tule tree, a small tequila factory and a Zapotec weaving community. The Tule tree is a Montezuma Cypress. It’s the widest tree in the world but not the oldest – there are older trees in California, Africa, and Japan (7,000 years old). The weaving village is a successful Zapotec project where members of the community help each other with building their homes and getting established.

New Year’s day caught me off-guard – unlike Christmas, most businesses were closed! Perhaps I shouldn’t put things off. I was looking forward to indulging in a hot chocolate at one of the specialty cafes I had spotted on my first day of wandering. Guess it will have to wait for a return visit. Maybe, then, I’ll be adventurous enough to try the grasshoppers!

Advertisements

Read Full Post »